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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
fleeing are going to greece. >> the emigrants' washing ashore are now struggling with their first european winter. they are from somalia, afghanistan, increasingly syrian. all on a camp that is run by volunteers to provide food and shelter. he has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brother in athens. >> our live was assured in syria. we cannot stay in syria. there were bombs attacking the houses. we cannot stay in syria. >> this is where many people cross over to the greek island from turkey. it is seen in the distance behind me. it is not far away, but the journey is dangerous. the boats used are often in battered conditions and at this time of year, the seas can be very rough. not everyone makes it across. more than 20 drowned from this group and here is the only survivor who was finished half dead out of the sea by the greek coastguard. they're now trying to call friends and family to tell them he is alive. he is receiving counseling, but he seems very confused about what to do next. meanwhile, more and more syrians are arriving in athens who know no one in this city
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
government privatisation plans. and and greece, civil servants have gone on a 24-hour price against job cuts. many public services were disrupted in the capital. >>> in south korea, voters have elected their first female president, who follows in the footsteps of her father who was also president. she is vowing to batter the economy. >> she has occupied a place on the national stage since the early 20's, but this is something new. if just before midnight, in freezing temperatures in central seoul, she addressed her supporters and the nation as the first female president elect. >> i will be the people's president who keeps promises to the citizens. this is the year of happiness we have all been waiting for. >> south korea remains a male- dominated society. just half of the working age women still have a job. if some see this as a transformative moment. >> there has been a glass ceiling in this society. with a woman president, took that we will demonstrate our troop qualities. >> i admit defeat, but it is just my defeat, not not that of others who are hoping to have a new government. i congrat
of the year of crisis with a steady hand. she has stuck to her goals in 2012 -- to save the euro and greece without compromising germany's financial stability. >> how alive is the concept of charity? we bring you an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
and albania as greece is from finland and europe is divided in different ways and has changed quite a lot. i would say there are a few elements though of a communist the communist past that you can see in post-communist countries. sometimes there is a paranoid elements and politics that comes from just a legacy of people being spied on and people having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals being done behind their backs. secret deals were done behind their backs and that is untenable and there is an anxiety about being less behind or left out by the west and seem to be inside the western hands. the memory that continues to play out but in truth these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. c-span: you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? and what were the three? >> guest: i chose poland, hungary and east germany? c-span: why those three? >> guest: i chose them because they were different because they have horse -- different historical backgrounds and they had a different political and mostly because they have
rate increases, maybe not at 250, but upper rate americans. we accomplished little in not become greece. this won't affect the debt situation. it will be a political victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of what we believe is republicans. hats off to the president, he won. >> reporter: democrats would acknowledge this deal, if there is a deal is smaller in scope and won't do as much for reducing the deficit long term as both sides hoped. the real focus is to focus the most harm on people. not having everyone's taxes going up. there's a lot more involved in it. we have been focused on taxes. we hope to have something that gives a sense of are they close? will they get there? within a couple hours. >> a couple hours. we'll check in with you again. thank you so much. i want to bring in a fiscal policy reporter, laura montgomery as well as political writer for "the new york times," john harwood. you heard kelly mention some republicans weren't feeling the president's interview on "meet the press" this morning. they took issue with it. from that interview and what you saw
rate increases on upper income americans. we have accomplished very little about becoming greece or getting out of debt. it is a political victory of the president. i hope we have courage when it comes to the debt ceiling. to fight as what we want as republicans. >> there was a lot of celebration but not anything to do with a deal being made. when house peeker john bone bone came in. republicans gave him a standing ovation . but there is no decision made. >> to chris wallace's name those who talk don't know . those who know don't talk. >> dave: some talk. republicans have made a significant compromise from what i can tell you. republicans have offered $400,000 thres hold for individuals and $550,000 for couples. that is a significant compromise for the republican ideology that did not want to raise taxes on the wealthy. it looks like they are come a long way and there is a $100,00000 . the estate tax and unemployment benefits. and there is all sorts of sequestitration and how they will accomplish thamp harry reid said there is significant distance with the parties. >> here's harr
greece in the uprising against the turks? [laughter] that, by the way, is a very profound joke. if you are an empire that wants to make sure you play by the rules, it is always good to have a group that is discriminated against and they will go off to build an empire. it is very important. it just came to me with that? if you look out the rest of the democratic world, the spaniards, you name it, they're not exactly gung ho about putting their blood on the line when it comes to pursuing our values. the point, i guess, here is that you always have to have somebody who runs the show. there has to be one of very large power. usually it is anglo-saxon. we are now in a phase of american development with the power that has carried the burden over the last 60 years, as we all know, wants to lead from behind and is retracting from afghanistan, from iraq, and they're now exerting their power from afar and from above. drones above, boots on the ground. i fear if nobody takes on the responsibility of organizing and maintaining, it will not be in the of -- will not be india. >> go ahead, minister.
of not becoming greece or getting out of debt. this won't affect the debt situation. >> sort of hats off, wink, wink. >> the president told "meet the press" they hope to get a deal condon in the next 48 hours. >>> police say a guy broke into a woman's home and drove her to the bank of america branch where she worked. she triggered an alarm but the suspect escaped before police arrived. it took the bomb squad three hours to remove the device from her neck. she did escape unharmed luckily. >> a best friend becomes a hero after rescuing a boy who fell through the ice in iowa. they were walking on a lake when the ice gave way, sending 11-year-old ashton eckenrod into the water. >> i thought i was going to die from it. and just not see my family any more. he didn't say anything. he was just leak freaking out. i didn't know what to do so he just grabbed my hand. >> his 10-year-old friend managed to slide across the ice and pull him back out. they are both doing just fine. >>> and think you are neurotic? that could be a good thing, you guys. >> thank good glance and you came down the hall and wouldn'
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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